The Federal Government

The federal government is a government  of  limited powers.  From  its inception,  the  federal  government  has  existed  for  three  reasons:

  1. Keep us safe.
  2. Maintain a stable, free, and prosperous economy.
  3. Provide individual liberties that protect us from the government, and not the government from us.

Over the years, the federal government has grown to a now unstable point. At this time in our history, we, the American people, must do something or we will implode.  Congress has the authority, and I argue the duty, to avoid this destruction of what we know to be the greatest country on God’s green earth.

While this imminent threat looms over our heads, our Congressman and most of his colleagues add gas to the flames. They sit back and preach one thing, and then turn around and pass legislation that adds to the national debt, does nothing to reduce the size of the federal government, and ignores the needs of a failing infrastructure across our country (and especially in our district). 

All of us have had a part in this.  All of us need to help.  Both parties are at fault.  It is time for both parties to work together.  It’s time to put country over party. It’s time to do something for our America, it’s time to help our country.  It’s not what you say, it’s what you do that counts. Country first. Always. Country first.

Fiscal Responsibility

Balancing the budget:

I support a balanced budget. It is a national security issue.  It is an economic fiduciary duty owed by Washington to us and future generations of Americans. Balancing the budget should not be a Republican or Democrat issue; it is an American issue.

Federal Agencies:

My approach, and one that I WILL INTRODUCE AND/OR SUPPORT LEGISLATION ON is to minimize the personnel, budget allocation, scope, and size of the federal agencies.  Government does not need to be so large in order   to run efficiently and effectively.  While Congress has delegated much of its legislative functions to the federal executive branch, it is time for Congress to work on its’ own issues and work together for the common good of our country.

Cutting, and even gutting some agencies, does two things:

      1. Significantly helps in balancing the budget; and
      2. Reduces federal bureaucracy.

Surplus:

Balancing the budget is only half of the fiscal battle. We need a surplus. Good business practices always state that one should have a surplus to cover several months of expenses for emergencies.  Many federal funding sources require it.  Our goals should be to budget to a significant surplus so that we can do the following:

Pay off our national debt.

Examine the current infrastructure (with me as the federal representative screaming from the mountain tops highlighting the urgent needs that our district has).

Keep our flood insurance premiums at a low and reasonable rate (as opposed to raising them which is exactly what half of our Louisiana delegation chose to do recently).

Specifically allocate funds for the following:

Social Security

Storm relief

Medicare

In addition, building into such legislation a mandated avenue of      replenishing the above funds (i.e. storm relief) as they are utilized.

Tax Reform

The American government has a responsibility to the citizens of this country.  And Congress has a fiduciary duty to the American people.  I support cutting taxes, but not at the expense of adding $1.5 trillion to our national debt over the next 10 years. Or restructuring our tax code to eliminate deductions that help ordinary Americans and small businesses.  The answer is simple:  CUT WASTEFUL SPENDING, starting with the ridiculous redundancy in federal agencies.

Healthcare

One of the most controversial but needed areas government is facing today is healthcare.  Currently, we are asking the wrong question in our country regarding healthcare.  Both Obamacare and the attempted replacement plan offered by the House Republicans asks who will pay for healthcare – the rich? the poor? the government?  Instead, we should ask why does healthcare cost so much?  Until we address free markets, tearing down the interstate lines and forcing health insurance companies to compete, we will not sufficiently solve this problem.

Infrastructure

We have serious traffic infrastructure needs in the 3rd District.  There are many improvements we can make to alleviate those problems.

Traffic can be reduced on the western side of the district by:  building an overpass in Westlake, and making the Westlake bridge on the road north to Moss Bluff a 4-lane instead of a 2-lane bridge.   Additionally, traffic could be rerouted by having a bypass (I-210 North bypass) to the north.

For safety reasons, we need to either replace or, at the minimum, renovate the I-10 bridge in Lake Charles.  From a national economic standpoint, our country would suffer if the I-10 bridge collapses, and needless to say, it would be a tragedy of epic proportions.

The I-49 South/Connector on the eastern side of the district could ease traffic and help it flow more easily lessening the burden of morning/afternoon traffic for people traveling to, from, or in Lafayette, New Iberia, and Morgan City.  Economically, we can bring more jobs to our district if we have the ability of an interstate system that flows all the way from Lafayette through Morgan City and further to the southeastern part of our state.

Regarding drainage:  I don’t need another economic impact study to tell me that water rolls downhill.  Areas, such as Acadia Parish, that have pontoon bridges need major attention. These makeshift bridges serve more as a dam than a realistic mode of transportation.  Recent problems with flooding indicate that we need to dredge bayous, coulees, ponds, and other natural bodies of water that ordinarily hold water.  Removing the trash, limbs, and other debris will free up room for these sources to hold water and assist in a more rapid flow for water to subside.  As the federal representative, I will work with local leaders to empower them in bringing their common sense, proactive measures of tackling drainage to action as opposed to just sitting in a room and talking about action. We need movement, and we need it now.

Our waterways are of extreme importance to all Louisianians.  The economic impact of waterways affects all of our citizens.  Dredging on a continuous basis is an effective preventative measure for proper drainage and maintenance of our waterways.  Our ship channels, from Lake Charles to Morgan City, should be appropriately dredged every year without a hint of hesitation.  As our next Congressman, I am confident that we can show the economic impact that a properly dredged ship channel in Lake Charles, for example, has on districts across the country represented by other members of Congress.  Dredging our ship channels is one of the few examples of our federal government actually getting a return on its investment.  We need to dredge our ship channels for economic impact and stability. We need to dredge our coulees, bayous, and other natural waterways to significantly help with drainage.

Louisiana yearns for a leader.

Leaders lead from the front, and they lead by example. They lead with their minds but never forget their heart. We are Americans, we are Louisianians, and WE can do better.

Country first. Always. Country first.